Project-Based Learning

ImageThe Nuts and Bolts of 21st Century Teaching,” a blog post written by Shelley Wright, details her experience with project-based learning for a Holocaust unit. I’ve heard about similar experiences with teachers using project-based learning, but I especially liked the one described here.

During student teaching, I did an introduction lesson for Night by Elie Wiesel. I wanted to give the student background information about the Holocaust and WWII but I figured they didn’t need a lesson about dates and events. They probably knew more specifics than I did! Instead, I decided to focus on the question “Could the Holocaust happen again?” We looked at propaganda techniques used by the Nazis and compared them to techniques used in advertising today. The lesson went well and I can understand why these students chose to look at this aspect of the Holocaust for their project.

I would love to incorporate project-based learning in my classrooms. My only concern would be the open-endedness of it. In my experience, students are hesitant to believe that there are no guidelines or directions about an assignment. They often ask for specifics even if you didn’t want to give them. However, if the project is proposed to them in the right way, I think they could overcome their initial uncertainty and take advantage of the opportunity.

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One thought on “Project-Based Learning

  1. Ms. Polo,

    What a great idea to ask that question, could the Holocaust happen again? That would make it truly a real-world, modern experience for students. Yes, students do seem to be hesitant to believe there are few guidelines or directions about an assignment. As Ms. Wright mentioned, there were some pregnant pauses now and then until students got used to being so empowered. I’m sure you would present any such project in such a way to help your students take the initiative while still creating an atmosphere of their feeling cared for/mentored.

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