Reaction to the Flipped Classroom

flippedTo be honest, the last couple of times I have heard the term “flipped classroom,” I wasn’t exactly sure what it was. I knew it had something to do with podcasts or videos but I didn’t know what it all entailed. This short video told me all I needed to know.

As with most new things, I was immediately excited. Of course this will work! It’s a great idea! A little tricky logistically, sure, but what a great direction to head in ESPECIALLY for high school.

So I took a look at the blog The Flipped Classroom: Pro and Con by Mary Beth Hertz to better understand both sides. As I suspected, the logistics of a flipped classroom might be problematic. But this blog goes on to explain Why It Matters,” to which she says:

The primary reason is because it is forcing teachers to reflect on their practice and rethink how they reach their kids. It is inspiring teachers to change the way they’ve always done things, and it is motivating them to bring technology into their classrooms…As long as learning remains the focus, and as long as educators are constantly reflecting and asking themselves if what they are doing is truly something different or just a different way of doing the same things they’ve always done, there is hope that some of Dewey’s philosophies will again permeate our schools.

Well said. It’s exciting to have the technology to explore these kinds of options. I doubt, in my first year of teaching, I will be able to completely adopt this method. However, I think I owe it to myself and to the students to try it at least once and see what happens.

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7 thoughts on “Reaction to the Flipped Classroom

  1. Dani, I think that the flipped classroom not only gives teachers time to refine their messages and reflect on how their lessons go, but it also terrifies me a little. I will be held forever accountable if I misspeak! Not that it happens all that often, but I think I will obsess a little over a canned video WAY more than I worry while I’m speaking candidly to my students. I still think it’s a great idea, though. I’m also trying to figure out how I can possibly make a lecture interesting without the interaction of my students. I wonder if I could get permission from my students’ parents, and get one or two to make a video WITH me sometimes, just to add a little flavor. I bet the other students would be entertained seeing their class-members help me online.

    Thanks for posting.

    • I tend to agree with the concern about any verbal “misspeaks” being around for perpetuity. I also find that teaching with just a camera in the room might be challenging because there is no interaction. It would definitely take getting used to. I am used to looking for students’ reactions as we go, and using a camera wouldn’t involve that, of course. On the whole, though, to help my students I’d sure give it a go.

      • Ack. I replied and then lost my reply… So here it is again. Rhonda, I am remembering that early on in our Marymount experience we had to video ourselves teaching a lesson. I remember teaching a lesson to an empty classroom and trying not to feel too awkward in front of my tri-podded camera. I even pretended I had in-class participation, and I responded to fictional questions and replies from the audience. We sure do live in a technologically enhanced world!

    • Thanks for including the quote about Dewey and the whole point of the flipped classroom and other technological advances in the field of education. Everything teachers do should help them question and reevaluate what they’re doing to reach students in different and meaningful ways. I feel that a lot of times teachers use technology to help them more easily do what they’ve always done instead of pushing themselves to do something truly new and radical. Of course, doing something really different (instead of merely doing the same thing in a different way) takes a lot more work, but I think it’s worth every effort.

  2. Thanks for including the quote about Dewey and the whole point of the flipped classroom and other technological advances in the field of education. Everything teachers do should help them question and reevaluate what they’re doing to reach students in different and meaningful ways. I feel that a lot of times teachers use technology to help them more easily do what they’ve always done instead of pushing themselves to do something truly new and radical. Of course, really doing something different (instead of just doing the same thing in a different way) takes a lot more work and effort, but I think it’s all worth it.

  3. Thanks for including the quote about Dewey and the whole point of the flipped classroom and other technological advances in the field of education. Everything teachers do should help them question and reevaluate what they’re doing to reach students in different and meaningful ways. I feel that a lot of times teachers use technology to help them more easily do what they’ve always done instead of pushing themselves to do something truly new and radical. Of course, doing something really different (instead of merely doing the same thing in a different way) takes a lot more work, but I think it’s worth every effort.

  4. Thanks for including the quote about Dewey and the whole point of the flipped classroom and other technological advances in the field of education. Everything teachers do should help them question and reevaluate what they’re doing to reach students in different and meaningful ways. I feel that a lot of times teachers use technology to help them more easily do what they’ve always done instead of pushing themselves to do something truly new and radical. Of course, doing something really different (instead of merely doing the same thing in a different way) takes a lot more work, but I think it’s worth every effort.

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